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Sneaky Composting — Worm Tube in the Garden

By April 19, 2012

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I've mentioned before that I have to be somewhat sneaky in my composting practices because we're not allowed  to compost food where I live -- we are only allowed to compost lawn and garden refuse. I started my sneaky food composting by composting in a plastic storage container, then a trash can. I dig and drop my food scraps right in my garden beds, and I have a worm bin. But we eat a lot of fruits and veggies especially during the growing season, and these systems do eventually become overloaded.

So when I saw the worm tube composting method over at the National Gardening Association's web site, I knew I had to try it. Basically, the idea is that you install a large (6 inch diameter) tube or pipe directly into your garden bed, and drop your food scraps into it. Pests can't get into it, but the worms from the garden can. They'll eat the goodies you leave, wiggle back out into your garden soil, and leave some goodies of their own in the form of vermicastings. I am definitely trying this, and I'll report back to tell you how it goes. If anyone else wants to try along with me, we can compare notes.

Have you tried a system like this? Tell us about it!

Comments

April 24, 2012 at 11:04 am
(1) Karen Boles says:

I have used a similar method to encourage worms in my tire gardens as well as my raised beds. I take large cottage cheese containers and cut out the bottom and then bury one or two ( depending on the space available ). I then start my feeding cycle by putting in a few worms and some finely chopped food scraps. Wet it down and replace lid. Thereafter , all I need to do is add food. This will eventually build up a nice worm population.

May 17, 2012 at 9:23 pm
(2) roy says:

I AM GOING TO TRY A FIVE GALLON BUCKET…WITH LID
1. CUT OUT BOTTOM
2. BURY ABOUT HALF WAY
3. KEEP DAMP
4. KEEP LID ON EXCEPT WHEN PUTTING IN YOUR STUFF…
butchfomby@yahoo.com

June 3, 2013 at 10:46 pm
(3) George Varghese says:

During my last visit to India, I noticed a great idea to compost. A 6″ diameter drainage pipe with one end caped prperly. Uncaped end into the ground (about 8 “) It won’t smell. It is good for composting most of the kitchen waste. Worms from the ground get into the tube which is very good. Items such as, eggs shell, lemon peel, orange peel should be avoided.

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