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What to Do With Green Tomatoes

By September 29, 2011

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I've been contemplating the first fall frost, which, in my area, usually hits sometime in October. I can feel the chill in the air in the mornings and evenings that signals the demise of my beloved tomatoes. I've been able to put up several jars of tomatoes and tomato sauce, and have enough dried tomatoes in my freezer right now to keep us in pizza-making heaven until we start harvesting again next summer.

But in no time, we will get that first frost warning, and I'll head out to the garden to harvest every last green tomato. I've become almost fanatical about waste lately; namely, reducing it. I used to think nothing of composting those last green tomatoes, but now, it's almost a game to me. I want to find a way to use every single possible morsel my garden produces. So, what am I going to do with those green tomatoes?

I can wrap and ripen them indoors. This would work better if I had a cool spot in my basement.

I can make green tomato pickles or fried green tomatoes. Both are absolutely delicious.

Green tomato jam is a winner as well. Yum!

Of course, if I can keep them growing a while longer, that's good too. Here's an easy tip for protecting your tomatoes, peppers, and other garden plants from frost. I'll probably end up doing some combination of these things when the time comes, but at least I have a plan in place. What do you do with green tomatoes?

Comments

September 20, 2009 at 6:17 pm
(1) Farmer John says:

We also make salsa out of green tomatoes!

October 5, 2009 at 1:31 pm
(2) Charlie says:

I cut the vines with the most tomatoes on them (small salad size or smaller) and hang them upside down in a warm place. They ripen much better than wrapped off the vine. I made grapefruit-tomatoe marmalade last year I just substituted half chopped up green tomatoes and added a little extra rind. I worked great. I have noticed over the years that green tomatoe preserves of all types don’t stay sealed as long as other jams so watch them more closely. I also put them in vegetable soups in the fall. I have found that as long as they make up no more tha 1/4 of the vegetables the soup is great. They make great relish and “pickles”. My aunt has made them for years and they are very popular! I have also made green tomato catsup (note it has a little bit of a bite to it, but we like it). That is brief list of what I do with them

September 29, 2011 at 9:34 pm
(3) Rob says:

I can them and then have fried green tomatoes during the winter.

October 10, 2011 at 2:48 pm
(4) doccat5 says:

It’s really not necessary to pull up the whole tomato plant. Just pick all the green tomatoes and layer them between sheets of newspaper, store in a cool, dry area and you’ll have fresh tomatoes for a good part of the winter. I also freeze and can some for green one’s during the winter.

November 3, 2011 at 10:37 am
(5) Sue says:

How do you can green tomatoes so that they can be used for fried green tomatoes? Won’t they be soggy? It sounds like a great idea, I was just wondering how to do it.

November 25, 2011 at 5:40 pm
(6) Karen says:

You can make a green tomato pie–tastes like a pie made w/tart apples. There are some good recipes on the internet–just google “green tomato pie”

May 2, 2012 at 7:00 am
(7) ozzyjock says:

hi, got this from a greek bloke i work with and its absolutley delicious especially if you love garlic and olive oil.
i wont even wait for my tomatoes to ripen anymore.
No exact quantaties here all info can be found on the web.
take your green tomatoes slice them or dice to prefered size, put in brine for 2 days, (salt ,water,vinager ) remove place in tub cover with olive oil and add garlic cloves, leave in cool place for a week.
taste and add garlic to suit. (can also add herbs or substitute eg chillies etc)
will last for ages and continue geting more flavoursome yummy.

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